Air Frame Repair

Scott F. Smith
sfsmith@oaktoninternational.com


 

Home
Introduction
Buying a Used Single Engine Aircraft
Engine Research & Installation
Avionics Research & Installation
Air Frame Repair
Finding a Flight School
Negotiating a Lease Back Agreement
Insurance
Maintenance
Commercial Operations
Cash Flow Analysis
Conclusion

At the time the engine was exchanged, we also had CMH Aviation do a 100 hour inspection to get the plane up to flight school and FAA airworthiness standards. CMH's mechanics found bracket that was cracked. The bracket holds the horizontal stabilizer on, so we thought it would be a good idea to replace it. The replacement part was a Cessna certified part that was reinforced in the corners of the bracket for improved strength. As you can see, it meant removing the entire tail assembly to replace the bracket.

Another issue they discovered was a previous wing skin replacement that was homemade instead of being repaired with Cessna sheet metal. The sheet aluminum that was used to repair the wing originally was too thin and "spongy" near the spar that it was riveted to. Since it was unacceptable, it had to be replaced.

We added shoulder harnesses, since the plane only had lap belts. Students must feel safe, and be safe, when learning to fly, and adding shoulder harnesses to the plane might save someone's life, in the case of an accident.

The Mechanic had to cut the headliner, but it turned out Ok.

 

• Home • Introduction • Buying and Aircraft • Engine Research & Inst. • Avionics Research & Inst. • Air Frame Repair • Finding a Flight School • Negotiating a Lease Back Agreement • Insurance • Maintenance • Commercial Operations • Cash Flow Analysis • Conclusion •

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